Showing posts with label aprons. Show all posts
Showing posts with label aprons. Show all posts

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Using Up the Stash

I have two sewing goals this year:

First:   I am going to try to make a significant dent in the stash---again.

Second:  Try new things, both projects and techniques. 

Soooo, first project:
The Gardening Apron!

Thought this apron might be better than my usual practice of ruining clothes digging in the dirt.  Used up some of the fabric, button, and ribbon stash--triple win.  It's my usual apron pattern BUT sewing ribbon on top of the webbing for the neck and waist straps was something I've been meaning to try forever.  Turned out to be easy, too.  Made the design on my Silhouette.  Close up of the little frog button: 

I even put on a nice big divided pocket rather than leaving it off  as I would normally do in my usual rush to just git 'er done.
Gotta have pockets for the clippers and such

Also used stash items for this plastic bag holder and dish drainer set for Keegan.
Oh, look!  A tiny bit of ribbon used for the hanger as well
Made the bag holder reversible in the same fabric as the drainer clothes.
Love the terry and cotton fabric drainer idea I found on Pinterest. Need to make some for me.  Why is it that we tend to make nicer things for other people?  This is my plastic bag holder...
Pathetic little thing thrown together out of desperation one day when the bags were threatening to overflow.  She used to have a sister, "Such Trash", hanging nearby who disappeared.  Sometimes my husband doesn't like my crafty ideas.

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Quick Peek at the Christmas Aprons and Towels

Okay!  After sitting around wasting time agonizing about which fabric to use, what colors, which embroidery designs, I've finally gotten busy with the aprons.  I decided months ago that I would make unisex aprons for my three kids and their mates or, as my son  likes to say, their counterparts. This apron is for one of the girls.
I'm using a heavier-weight denim which is making sewing on the straps a pain with the multiple layers of heavy fabric.  I've ordered some nylon webbing that I may end up using instead.  The embroidery design is from Urban Threads, and I'm quite happy with it.
There's a theme going here believe it or not.  This design goes with the "you wash, I'll dry" designs I put on sets of white with denim blue trim kitchen towels.
Design is from The Embroidery Library
I have a set of yellow towels to match the yellow apron design and teal towels for the apron designs in teal.  I do hope this is making sense.  It's after midnight here.  I probably shouldn't be allowed to put things on the internet at this hour.  Feel free to let me know of any errors.

Moving on!  The last couple will be spending Christmas in Mongolia which will give me a few more weeks to stress out about colors for them.

My latest setback is this design which I planned to use of the guys' aprons.
It just looks wonky cuz it's hanging wrong.  

First, it turns out that most people have no idea what this means.  For those people, the urban dictionary defines it as being a response to a statement that something cannot be done.  Example:  "You cannot possibly do that recipe.  It's too hard." Response "Challenge Accepted"  To me, it seemed like such a male response to cooking--the men in my family anyway.

 Second issue with this design is that all those curly lines look too feminine to me now that it's on an apron.  The shiny embroidery thread further adds to this problem.  My daughter's counterpart (I can't believe i just typed that word) is a weight-lifting, motorcycle-driving mechanic. Only his tools can  shine.  Any suggestions for a replacement design or quote would be most appreciated.

Sunday, July 3, 2011

Baker's Apron Tutorial

I made this baker-style apron as a birthday gift  for my son's fiance.  She loves to cook and often uses my apron for her culinary ventures. It's made of white denim from Joann's.  Decorative cotton is pretty, but I wanted the denim which is more likely to keep the spills from going through the fabric.  My old natural bull denim apron is a workhorse that has lasted for years.

In addition to the small pocket in the top bib portion, there is a large pocket divided into two section just below the waist.

I found the embroidery design from  The hardest part about the apron was choosing the design for embroidery.  There are so many fun ones!  Some of the other designs I bought said, "Is Carrot Cake a Vegetable?", "I Have a Knive and I Know How to Use It", and, my favorite, "Spooning Leads to Forking."  All will be going on some Huck toweling fabric soon.

Now for the tutorial. The amount of fabric will depend on the width of the fabric you are buying and the amount of shrinkage that can be expected.   Prewash your fabric!  You will need:
  •  one piece of fabric 34.5x 31.5" for the main part of the apron
  • one strip of denim measuring 35x3" for the neck strap and D-rings strap (You will cut off  7" of this for the D-ring strap)
  • 2 strips 35x3.5" for the waist ties (long enough to wrap around to the front for tying)
  • 1 piece of denim 8.5x5.5" for the top pocket OR, if you don't have a serger,  one 8.5x10.5" for the fold-over method
  • one piece of fabric 8.5x15" for the bottom pocket OR, if you don't have a serger, make this piece 16.5x15" 
  • 2 one-inch D-rings
Directions for getting the curved sides on the main piece of fabric:  Fold the main piece of fabric in half across the 31.5" side.  You're going to mark the curved area from the top to the waist.  Starting at what is the neck area measure from the fold out and mark using a chalk marker or disappearing marker or whatever it is that you use:
  • at the top, mark 5.5" from the fold
  • 4" down from top, 6.5 inches out from the fold
  • 6.25" down, 8 inches out from the fold
  • 7.25" down, 9 inches from the fold
  • 9" down, 11 inches from the fold
  • 11" down,  should come to the edge of the fabric
I didn't take photos of this part of the process, but here is a  picture showing the marked curve on another piece of fabric.  I have a Wright's EZ Flex Design Ruler that bends to the curve for marking, but you could use any firm but flexible strip of plastic, a piece of string, or do this freehand.
See my little dots next to the ruler?  Once you've marked out your line, cut it!

When you have all the pieces cut, here are the seam and sewing measurements.  I don't serge the main piece of fabric because I prefer the hems to be really solid. All are folded under twice.  Aprons in this house get a lot of use and spend their fair share of time in the washer and dryer.

For the main piece of fabric:
  • Hem the curved side seams first.  Press under a scant 1/4" seam.  (I use a seam gauge while pressing for this. It's easy to set the exact measure to stay on target.)  Then turn it under another 1/4" and press.  Pin and sew these curved edges in place about 1/8" from the edge of the seam.
  • Hem the straight side seams by turning under and pressing 1/4" then turning and pressing 1/2".  Sew 1/8" from the edge of the seam.
  • Hem the top, neck end by pressing under 1/2", then 3/4".  Again sew about 1/8" from the edge of the seam.
  • Hem the bottom turning and pressing first 1/2", then 1" with the same 1/8" sewing line. 
For the 36x3" neck straps:
  • Press in 1/2" on each long side.  Then fold this in half and  press.  This will leave you with a 1" wide strip. (You might be wondering why not just do the" fold in half and press each side into the center" method which is easier.  That would make the straps bulkier and stiffer since this is denim. Hence, this method.  A little more work, but the straps are more flexible and comfortable.)
  •  Now, cut 7" off the end.  Fold and press the short ends of both strips under 1/4".  Sew the long ends of each piece closed 1/8" from the edge on both pieces.  Then sew the short ends closed.    
  • Slide the two D-rings on the 7" strip.  Fold it in half and place it on what will be the right-hand side of the apron when you are wearing it.   (Look at the photo if your confused.)  With the stitching line side on the outside edge,  place this folded piece one inch down on the inside corner and sew in place using the usual square with an x inside for strength. 
  •  Now sew a line just under the D-rings to hold them in place.  Directions will be on the D-ring package if you've not used them before. 
  • Sew the other neck strap on the other side in the same way.  Remember to have the stitching line on the outside edge.
For the waist ties:
  • With both 35x 3.5" strip, Press in 1/2" on each long end, then fold in half and press.  Fold under a quarter of an inch on the short ends, and sew the long ends and both short ends closed 1/8" from the edge.
Okay! The basic apron is complete!  Now for the top pocket which you've decorated-- or not.
  • First the directions for a serger because  I do use my serger for the pockets since these seams are inside and don't get as much abuse as the outside edges of the apron.
    •  Serge around the squares and press in a 1/4 seam around all four sides.  
    • Sew the upper edge seam of the pocket across, again using 1/8 sewing line.  
    • Now place the pocket 3" down from the top, center it, and pin in place.  Sew the sides and bottom to the apron using the 1/8 line. Remember to reinforce the top corners with a few extra stitches.  Pockets get a lot of tugging there.
  • If you are not using a serger
    • Fold the pocket in half inside out (if it matters with your fabric or if you have embroidered, painted, appliqued a design) to get an 8.5x5.25" square. 
    •  Sew the two sides shut using 1/4" seam allowance.
    • Turn right side out and press the open ends in 1//4" You can sew a  line across the folded edge now if you want to.  It will give you a crisp top pocket edge.  It's not necessary, though.  
    • Place the pocket with the folded edge at the top 3 inches down from the top and centered. Pin in place.   Sew the sides and bottom to the apron using the same 1/8 sewing line.
For the bottom pocket, you will do the same as the top pocket.  If not using a serger, fold the fabric into an 8.25x15" square and follow the same instructions as for the smaller pocket.  Place this pocket 14.5" down from the top and centered.  Pin and sew it in place and you are finished!

It's actually a quick and easy project.  Give it a try.